Free Comic Book Day 2014: Uncle Scrooge Review: Lucky Ducky

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014
Waitaminit, a Don drawing "Don?" I think I just had an "Inception" moment...

Don Rosa, the creator of this issue, drawing Uncle Scrooge at MegaCon 2012. You can see some of his other Disney drawings on the wall behind him. Ain’t he just ducky?

Starting with this post, I plan on taking a comprehensive look at some of what, I think, are the more outstanding issues in my collection of free comics from this year’s Free Comic Book Day.  This is something I have wanted to write about since I started this blog, and I can’t wait to show you what each new issue has to offer. 

One of my favorite issues thus far has been the Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck comic from Disney and Fantagraphics Books.  This crazy cartoonish comic features two spectacular stories by Don Rosa, a veteran Disney comics writer and artist.  He has been the premier chronicler of the Duckberg denizens’ adventures for over two decades.  Rosa also presents an essay in this issue in which he recounts how he got started in the comics world and explains some of the interesting details regarding the two featured stories. 

(One small correction before we move on: In my previous Free Comic Book Day post, I stated that this issue featured work from Carl Barks, the legendary creator of Scrooge McDuck.  Actually, it’s just Don Rosa for this issue; the last few years have featured Barks’ work exclusively for the Free Comic Book Day issues, so I guess I just had him on the brain.  Still, Rosa is commonly viewed by Disney comics fanatics as the heir apparent to Barks’ lofty throne and, in my opinion, he has done just as much if not more to make the ducks’ escapades some of the funniest, most exciting comics ever published, so we’re still in good hands here, folks.  I do, however, apologize for my slip up.)

The FCBD 2014 US&DD (Yes indeedy!) issue contains two fun Don Rosa tales from the 1990s, a time when Disney comics were not as widely circulated here in America as they were in other parts of the world (Italy, mostly), so for many readers, me included, this is the first time these stories have been widely available.  I can safely say that both of them have been well worth the wait.  The first story, “A Matter of Some Gravity,” involves Scrooge, Donald Duck, Huey, Dewey, and Louie attempting to prevent the evil Magica De Spell from stealing Scrooge’s lucky Number One Dime.  Magica casts a spell on Scrooge and Donald which inverts their personal senses of gravity.  They are forced to walk along walls and across ceilings, as well as desperately grab at any foothold they can find, as they chase Magica down.

This story is very entertaining to me, mostly from a visual standpoint.  Don Rosa employs a clever arrangement for the comic panels: the top half of each page presents events from a “normal” point of view, while the bottom half shows things from Scrooge and Donald’s “gravitationally challenged” (Don’s own words, couldn’t have said any better myself) perspective.  These clashing perspectives were fun for me to keep track of, and I enjoyed seeing how the ducks tackled seemingly simple tasks like negotiating a steep hill and riding a bus, made nearly impossible to complete when one’s perspective has been inverted.  I’ve encountered this same kind of fun in ’60s Superman comics in which science and conventional laws of physics seemed to run amok, and I think Rosa captures much of that whimsical spirit here as well.  I also feel that this story is a fantastic introduction to the Disney duck comics and a great imagination-sparker.

The next story in this issue is a Donald Duck yarn entitled “The Sign of the Triple Distelfink.”  While it was not as entertaining for me as “Gravity,” I think it still provides some fascinating food for thought.  The main character is not the Don himself, but rather his less famous, but no less iconic, comics-based cousin, Gladstone Gander.  According to Rosa’s essay, he wrote this tale for Gladstone’s 50th anniversary, and again, I think it serves as a wonderful intro to this great character.  The gander’s claim to fame is that he has outrageously good luck: he wins sweepstakes, gets out of tough scrapes through wildly improbable coincidences, and generally goes through life with little trouble, a trait that gets on Donald’s nerves.  However, in this story, Gladstone is faced with a day of outrageously bad luck.  It’s his birthday, you see, and every year on this special day, his normally good luck is reversed. 

Donald, Scrooge and various other members of the extended duck family throw a birthday party for Gladstone, but he doesn’t want to attend because he fears his bad luck might cause undue harm to his loved ones.  He spends the majority of the story trying to avoid the party by taking a train, boat, plane, and other methods of travel to escape, but his bad luck interferes every time.  The accidents that pile up and the other characters’ reactions to Gladstone’s bad luck are what made this story stand out to me.  The “bad luck” bits did get a bit predictable, but I thought the way things were resolved in the end was quite clever.  And don’t worry, Gladstone is back to having good luck by the end; no cooked goose tonight!

The Free Comic Book Day issue of Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck is one of my favorite issues from this year.  I think it contains a healthy dose of fun and some clever stories from a sound craftsman in Don Rosa.  Even better, there’s a promo in the front of the issue which states there is a new collection of some of Rosa’s other Disney work coming in July!  I can’t wait!

There’s more fun from FCBD 2014 on the way here at Kellog Thoughts!  I do not plan on covering every single issue I collected from this year’s festivities, but I do want to feature the comics which I think are simply outstanding, so stay tuned!  Leave your thoughts on this issue, Donald, Scrooge, Disney, and comics in the comments, and happy reading!

“Disney’s Think Fast”: A Magical Time with Trivia

Monday, September 30th, 2013
Who's the leader of the club?

Darn, this mouse’s head is everywhere!

You never know what you might find when you go off the beaten path.  For instance, I recently went on a garage sale trip with my parents and came back with a highly unusual game, a trivia extravaganza known as Disney’s Think Fast.  I remember reading about this game on Wikipedia and watching a handful of YouTube videos of other people playing, and wondered if I would like playing it if I ever got my hands on a copy.  Well, I have finally gotten my chance to do so, and I am pleased to report that it is indeed a rapid, fun, magical trivia tussle.

Disney’s Think Fast is a 2008 game for the Wii and PlayStation 2 (I played my version on the latter system) from Disney Interactive Studios in which players get to play through a question-filled game show themed after the wide world of Disney movies.  The set on which the game is played is shaped like Mickey Mouse’s head, the Genie from Aladdin  is your host, and your selection of contestants includes Mickey and Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Goofy, Scrooge McDuck, and even some relatively obscure characters such as Horace Horsecollar, Clarabelle Cow, and even Magica DeSpell (one of Scrooge’s rivals from the old Ducktales TV show, and she’s voiced by her signature voice actress, June “Rocky the Flying Squirrel” Foray!).  One to four players use special game show buzzer-shaped controllers to battle their way through five to seven rounds of regular trivia, Pictionary-type drawings, and quirky mini-games.  Highest score at the end of the game wins!

For my first time playing, I played a seven-round solo game as Goofy and the setting was at London’s Regents Park from 101 Dalmations (you can pick different backgrounds as well including Hawaii from Lilo and Stitch, Ariel’s grotto from The Little Mermaid, and the Pride Lands from The Lion King).  Most of the game was made up of trivia questions as one might expect: a question would pop up with various pictures representing the possible answers.  I picked answers by pressing the corresponding colored button on my controller.  If I chose the right answer, I got points, but if I got the wrong answer, I lost points.  I knew some of the answers, but not all of them.  It was a nice mix of questions, some of it based on Disney, and some based on real-world analogues to Disney characters and locations (Which of these animals is most similar to Lady from Lady and the Tramp?  Choose the picture of the dog for the win!).  The Pictionary drawing round was surprisingly similar to the straight-up trivia rounds: identify the character or place being drawn from a field of choices. 

Things got a bit strange when I  got to the “special guest” round.  I did not expect Lucky from 101 Dalmations to read questions about his movie, but then I thought, “Wow, it’s awesome that there are other characters here I didn’t know about!”  Apparently, other “guests” can appear based on the location you play in, so if you’re in the Pride Lands for instance, Simba will stop by, or if you’re playing in Hawaii, Stitch becomes the guest.  I can’t wait to see what Stitch might be like; he’s one of my favorite Disney characters from recent times, so I think it’ll be pretty cool to see him again!

One mini-game showed up during my solo play.  It involved spotting the differences between a group of Grecian urns featuring the muses from Hercules.  The instructions for this game stated it would get harder as time ticked away, but I did not notice any particular increase in difficulty.  The only major change I noticed was that the muses started wearing sunglasses, which did make them look quite silly to me!  I think the only way that an increase in the level of difficulty might be a major factor is if a young person was playing this game, but, with a little help,  they might do well because the differences are usually very obvious.

Overall, my first time playing Disney’s Think Fast left a very favorable impression on me.  The questions were a nice mix of easy and obscure stuff with a few stumpers that threw me off guard.  The presentation is top-notch with some great shout-outs to different Disney properties, and the Genie makes for a great, if somewhat hyperactive, game show host.  I think this game might be a big winner with my family and friends at parties.  There’s room for up to four players with everyone having their own buzzer controller, so I would not mind having three more human opponents to share the magic with me.  This game gets a big thumbs up from me!

How good are you at trivia games?  What’s the most obscure piece of trivia you have ever heard of?  Let me know in the comments.  Until next time, keep wishing on those stars and always let your conscience be your guide!  (Pinochio is still cool with the kids, right?)

Random Top Five: Favorite Lines From Disney’s “Bolt”

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

I caught the last few minutes of the Disney movie Bolt the other night and, having nothing better to do at that particular moment, I decided to watch the heck out of those last few minutes.  This film about a talking TV dog named Bolt, a cynical cat named Mittens, a Bolt-obsessed hamster named Rhino, and their cross-country mission to reunite Bolt with his owner, Penny, has become one of my favorite movies of all time, and my mom really likes it, too.  If I see it playing on TV, I’ll tell my mom about it and we’ll watch it for a few minutes.  It certainly helps that the movie is full of clever and funny dialogue that I often find myself quoting when I am bored.  Here’s five of my favorite lines from Bolt that I’m sure might get stuck in your head as well.  If you want some more great lines to pull out of your pocket anytime, check out Bolt‘s WikiQuotes page.

5.  “This greatly irks me, I am irked!”  (Dr. Calico)

At the beginning of the movie, the viewer is treated to an “episode” of the TV show Bolt stars in.  The plot basically involves Penny’s father being kidnapped by the evil Dr. Calico and Bolt and Penny racing off to save him.  When Calico receives the news of Bolt and Penny’s actions from one of his henchmen, he says the quoted line above.  For some strange reason, my mom and I find this line incredibly funny, even though the movie acts like it’s no big deal.  I think our appeal for this line stems from the fact that Calico says “irk” twice, which is thoroughly unnecessary and absurd.  I view it in the same manner as the classic Monty Python sketch where everyone in a restaurant keeps repeating the word “Spam” in conversation.  It’s unusual to hear the same word repeated multiple times in a row, so I definitely notice it when it does happen, and considering the movie has been very serious in tone up to this point, this line turns on the funny faucet full blast for me every single time.

4.  “I know this dog…no, no, I don’t know.  I thought I knew.”  (Pigeons)

When Bolt begins his journey to find Penny, he is still trying to figure where to go and why none of the superpowers he believes himself to have are working.  Seeking help, he tries talking to a group of pigeons.  The birds, although well-meaning, do not provide much assistance.  In fact, they struggle to even remember Bolt at all, even though they appear to be familiar with him in some way as the above quote alludes to.  Throughout the scene in which the pigeons appear, a series of buses drive by, each having a billboard for Bolt’s TV show on its side with the dog’s likeness prominently featured.  The pigeons fail to notice these, even as it seems they are just about to have a moment of recognition.  These pigeons are some of the funniest characters in the movie, and they turn into a running gag as the movie plays; no matter how many clues are around them, the pigeons don’t ever recognize him.  This is some great, simple stuff that is just plain funny.  What more can I say?

3.  “Now I’m concerned on a number of levels.”  (Mittens)

Mittens is a black-and-white stray cat who joins Bolt early in his trek across the United States.  She tries her hardest to make Bolt reconcile his superpower delusions with reality, often to little avail.  Her attempts in doing so are further fouled up with the addition of Rhino, a hamster who watches Bolt’s show religiously and has become an unabashed fanboy for his favorite hero.  When Bolt and Rhino first meet each other, they become fast friends, formulating plots to get back at Dr. Calico (at this point in the film, both the dog and the hamster think Penny has been kidnapped by the show’s main villain).  Mittens, the most sane member of the main cast at the moment, expresses her unspoken thoughts about the mental state of the group with the above quote.  It’s a blunt statement and based mostly on first impressions, but I appreciate its “in-your-face” nature and how it showcases Mittens’s personality so effectively.  She does become a much nicer, more forgiving character as time goes on, but I think this is my favorite moment with her.

2. “What?  What is this red liquid coming from my paw?””  (Bolt)

As I mentioned earlier, Bolt’s perception of reality is greatly flawed throughout most of the film.  He has existed in a “bubble” for most of his life, never venturing outside of his TV show’s fictional world.  Therefore, it comes to him as a great shock when, after making a reckless jump off a moving truck, he experiences great pain.  More evidence of his mortality emerges when one of his paws apparently starts bleeding (it’s hard to tell since the movie never actually shows the bleeding paw, or any blood for that matter).  This is a great surprise to him, causing him to deliver the above line.  It’s not the line itself that makes me like it so much.  It’s the way that Bolt’s voice actor, John Travolta, delivers the line that makes it a winner for me.  Travolta’s voice registers surprise and a bit of wooziness due to Bolt’s slow recovery from the fall he just took.  He sounds adorably dopey for the few seconds he says this line, in a rare moment of quiet between a big stunt and further plot development.  It’s one of those “blink-and-you’ll miss it” moments you only get in animated films, and one that always gives me a little smile whenever I see it.

1. “Ring, Ring.  Who is it?  DESTINY?!  I’ve been expecting your call.”  (Rhino)

Rhino, the hamster, is my favorite character in Bolt, hands down.  The things he says throughout the film are some of the funniest, wittiest, and most memorable lines I can ever remember hearing for the first time and instantly liking.  There’s a handful of lines from him I could have put in this spot (his “Let it begin!  Let it BEGIN!” is one I’m particularly partial to), but if I wanted to sum his character up with one line, this one would be it.  He takes the mission of saving Penny quite seriously and fancies himself as a secret agent of sorts, the kind you might find most often in the movies.  Naturally, this role entails delivering cheesy dialogue on occasion, something this line does very well.  It’s funny, serious, somewhat cliched, and amusingly original, all at the same time.  Definitely a line worth keeping on hand in my view.

Have you ever found yourself quoting your favorite movie or TV show?  What are your favorite lines and why?  Leave your lines and your stories in the comments.